Nginx ProxMox Proxy using Letsencrypt SSL cert

Why use a nginx proxmox proxy using letsencrypt ssl? 1st: why not? 2nd: Load balancing! Nginx is built to handle many concurrent connections at the same time from multitude of clients. This makes it ideal for being the point-of-contact for said clients. The server can pass requests to any number of backend servers to handle the bulk of the work, which spreads the load across your infrastructure. This design also provides you with flexibility in easily adding backend servers or taking them down as needed for maintenance. 3rd: Security! Many times Nginx can be secured to not allow access to certain parts of the underlying application so life doesnt throw you a curveball at 3AM on December 24th 2006(dont ask 🙁 ). 4th: Port firewall constraints! Sometimes you need to access an application on port 34563 but firewall doesn’t allow access on random ports. You can allow incoming connections on port 80 via nginx but proxy them to the app on 34563. 5th: seriously… why not….. Now you know why we may want nginx as  a frontend proxy for our underlying app. so let’s get to setting it up for our use case which is to protect proxmox from bad actors! and to provide reliable access to our proxmox for ourselves. We are going to setup nginx to forward all traffic from port 80 to port 443 where letsencrypt will provide us with ssl encrypted access! Install nginx light instead of full, so you have a smaller set of utilities but also a lighter install. you can install […]

Ubuntu & Bash tutorial & basic utilities

An introduction to the CLI (Command Line Interface) and Bash on Ubuntu Linux aka a bash tutorial The default shell that is installed on Ubuntu Linux is bash. Alternatives exist, but they’re beyond the scope of this tutorial (check our post here for more info on how to isntall a better alternative to bash called Zshell or zsh). Bash is available on almost all Linux distributions, so this tutorial will work on most Linux distributions as well. What is a shell? Simply put, the shell is a program that takes your commands from the keyboard and gives them to the operating system to perform. In the old days, it was the only user interface available on a Unix computer. Nowadays, we have graphical user interfaces (GUIs) in addition to command line interfaces (CLIs) such as the shell. Bash is the most popular shell application for Linux, and is the default on Ubuntu and hundreds of other Linux distributions, Mac OS X, and soon Windows 10. The basics are: You type one or more command(s), hit enter, and it runs the command(s). Use the up/down arrows to go through your bash history. Ctrl+P also works Use Ctrl+R to search the history of commands used previously. Hitting tab will autocomplete commands. Instead of typing cd ~/myfolder1/ you can just type cd ~/my<tab> and it’ll either autocomplete fully or if there are still more folders (like my234 and myfolder1), it’ll show you your options. You can enter multiple commands by separating them with “;” or “&&”. ; allows commands […]