Nginx ProxMox Proxy using Letsencrypt SSL cert

Why use a nginx proxmox proxy using letsencrypt ssl? 1st: why not? 2nd: Load balancing!¬†Nginx is built to handle many concurrent connections at the same time from multitude of clients. This makes it ideal for being the point-of-contact for said clients. The server can pass requests to any number of backend servers to handle the bulk of the work, which spreads the load across your infrastructure. This design also provides you with flexibility in easily adding backend servers or taking them down as needed for maintenance. 3rd: Security! Many times Nginx can be secured to not allow access to certain parts of the underlying application so life doesnt throw you a curveball at 3AM on December 24th 2006(dont ask ūüôĀ ). 4th: Port firewall constraints! Sometimes you need to access an application on port 34563 but firewall¬†doesn’t allow access on random ports. You can allow incoming connections on port 80 via nginx but proxy them to the app on¬†34563. 5th: seriously… why not….. Now you know why we may want nginx as ¬†a frontend proxy for our underlying app. so let’s get to setting it up for our use case which is to protect proxmox from bad actors! and to provide reliable access to our proxmox for ourselves. We are going to setup nginx to forward all traffic from port 80 to port 443 where letsencrypt will provide us with ssl encrypted access! Install nginx light instead of full, so you have a smaller set of utilities but also a lighter install. you can install […]

Linux distribution info & kernel info

Do you have multiple vms and real machines you use for random testing, and small tasks? need to know what machine you are on? what kernel you are using? what the current Linux distribution info is? what OS version did you last install on here? and more such questions? well! we have some of the answers for you. well maybe not answers, but more like small tools so you can get the answers! Distribution info lsb_release -a on my ubuntu system it gives the following result : $ lsb_release -a No LSB modules are available. Distributor ID: Ubuntu Description: Ubuntu Xenial Xerus (development branch) Release: 16.04 Codename: xenial On a debian system it gives the following result : # lsb_release -a No LSB modules are available. Distributor ID: Debian Description: Debian GNU/Linux 8.4 (jessie) Release: 8.4 Codename: jessie If¬†lsb_release -a doesn’t cut it for you then you can try cat /etc/issue as a result we see the following examples : # cat /etc/issue Debian GNU/Linux 8 \n \l $ cat /etc/issue Ubuntu Xenial Xerus (development branch) \n \l In some cases where you suspect you are on centos or redhat, maybe because you noticed the package versions are old enough to be used by columbus while sailing the open seas, then you can use either cat /etc/centos-release or cat /etc/redhat-release which will give you result such as : CentOS release 6.2 (Final) Kernel Info now as far as finding the kernel info goes you can get¬†all the info you need via uname. $ uname -a […]

Debian package management speed ups

No one likes to sit around waiting for slow mirrors while updating multiple packages but its a fact of life usually. In debian it means typing apt-get update and sitting around for a while, then doing the actual install or upgrade and getting some coffee. what if you could speed the process along somewhat? well now just like we showed you how to speed up apt downloads for ubuntu you can speed up the apt speeds for Debian! This way you can focus more on clashing some clans or something…. whatever you do in your free time that is. Httpredir In comes¬†httpredir, “It uses the geographic and network location of the user and the mirrors, the architecture of the requested files, IP address family, the availability and freshness of the mirrors, and a few other things” to find the closest and fastest mirror of data for you. This gives you the quickest way to get your files without resorting to new tools or alternate package managers. This is already there for Jessie ( debian 8 ) so no need to edit that, but for everyone else on older releases this will bring wonderful speedups. setting up httpredir is simple : edit your /etc/apt/soucres.list deb http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian sid main deb-src http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian sid main replace with deb http://httpredir.debian.org/debian sid main deb-src http://httpredir.debian.org/debian sid main

Aptitude installed package list

Today I got a new VPS‚Ķ well great but now I need to install a bunch of new packages and libraries and helper apps. how do I remember it all? did I have python 2.6 or 2.7? not to mention which boost libs did I install? well here.s a couple of ways to deal with this issue of whats on my installed package list. Using dkpg and apt-get dpkg –get-selections > selections.txt Scp / email / copy to USB or copy it bit by bit, whatever floats your boat. Move to new machine. dpkg ‚Äďset-selections < selections.txt apt-get update apt-get upgrade voil√† it should be ok. but there’s a lot of clutter, like libraries and dependencies that were needed on old machine and might not be needed again. so how to find a cleaned up list? or alteast one that shows the automated installed? there’s always aptitude its simpler in syntax and better imho Using Aptitude aptitude search ‘~i’ which gives you aresult of all your packages like : i¬†¬† udev¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† – /dev/ and hotplug management daemon i A unattended-upgrades¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† – automatic installation of security upgrades i¬†¬† upstart¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† – event-based init daemon i A usbutils¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† – Linux USB utilities i¬†¬† util-linux¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† – Miscellaneous system utilities i¬†¬† vim¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† – Vi IMproved – enhanced vi editor i¬†¬† vim-common¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† – Vi IMproved – Common files i¬†¬† vim-runtime¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† – Vi IMproved – Runtime files i¬†¬† wget¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† – retrieves files from the web This of course scrolls all the packages past your view very quickly and can be …. hard […]