Nginx ProxMox Proxy using Letsencrypt SSL cert

Why use a nginx proxmox proxy using letsencrypt ssl? 1st: why not? 2nd: Load balancing! Nginx is built to handle many concurrent connections at the same time from multitude of clients. This makes it ideal for being the point-of-contact for said clients. The server can pass requests to any number of backend servers to handle the bulk of the work, which spreads the load across your infrastructure. This design also provides you with flexibility in easily adding backend servers or taking them down as needed for maintenance. 3rd: Security! Many times Nginx can be secured to not allow access to certain parts of the underlying application so life doesnt throw you a curveball at 3AM on December 24th 2006(dont ask 🙁 ). 4th: Port firewall constraints! Sometimes you need to access an application on port 34563 but firewall doesn’t allow access on random ports. You can allow incoming connections on port 80 via nginx but proxy them to the app on 34563. 5th: seriously… why not….. Now you know why we may want nginx as  a frontend proxy for our underlying app. so let’s get to setting it up for our use case which is to protect proxmox from bad actors! and to provide reliable access to our proxmox for ourselves. We are going to setup nginx to forward all traffic from port 80 to port 443 where letsencrypt will provide us with ssl encrypted access! Install nginx light instead of full, so you have a smaller set of utilities but also a lighter install. you can install […]

Alsa CLI Volume control

I couldn’t find the silly volume control in the system settings one day so i figured there had to be something I could use to control volume settings like mic boost without needing a gui or remembering names and numbers for the CLI. well there is and it’s so easy a caveman could do it (hah remember those ads….)…. so without further ado here’s a fun and great way to control your volume via Alsa CLI Volume control. type the following then use your arrows to move right/left and make the volume higher or lower by using up/down keys: alsamixer -c 0 the 0 at the end is the number of your device. if a system only has one device you will use 0. if you have two devices you can use 0 or 1. it tells you the name of the device currently being edited so you don’t give yourself a heart attack by changing the wrong volume. picture of the control is attached.   [et_pb_section admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”] [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Ubuntu 16.04 release changes & info

Ubuntu 16.04, code-named “Xenial Xerus”, is here and its amazing! many new changes, many new additions and some removals of old outdated software/functionality. Unity has been polished and streamlined along with the much maligned ads have been removed! so lets get into the details. Snap Packages Ubuntu 16.04 LTS introduces a new application format, the ‘snap’, which can be installed alongside traditional deb packages. These two packaging formats live comfortably next to one another and enable Ubuntu to maintain its existing processes for development and updates. In short you can now install third party apps or who desktop environments without having to worry about polluting your OS! Everything stays confined away from the rest of the system in a nice little self contained environment yet still allows access to the rest of the system. So you have Apps can install with their own specific set of libraries and dependencies without issues with other existing apps or ones you may install in the future. Safety & security are bolstered across the board. Packages As with any ubuntu upgrade there are many package upgrades and software changes. Ubuntu now defaults to kernel 4.4+ python2 is out and python 3.5 is now the base. you can still install python 2 but python 3 is the new norm. Vim by default now uses python 3. Golang is now using th 1.6 toolchain. With the recent discoveries in vulnerable crypto settings in openssh, the new base OpenSSH 7.2p2 disables many to bolster security. the GNU toolchain is now updated to […]

Linux distribution info & kernel info

Do you have multiple vms and real machines you use for random testing, and small tasks? need to know what machine you are on? what kernel you are using? what the current Linux distribution info is? what OS version did you last install on here? and more such questions? well! we have some of the answers for you. well maybe not answers, but more like small tools so you can get the answers! Distribution info lsb_release -a on my ubuntu system it gives the following result : $ lsb_release -a No LSB modules are available. Distributor ID: Ubuntu Description: Ubuntu Xenial Xerus (development branch) Release: 16.04 Codename: xenial On a debian system it gives the following result : # lsb_release -a No LSB modules are available. Distributor ID: Debian Description: Debian GNU/Linux 8.4 (jessie) Release: 8.4 Codename: jessie If lsb_release -a doesn’t cut it for you then you can try cat /etc/issue as a result we see the following examples : # cat /etc/issue Debian GNU/Linux 8 \n \l $ cat /etc/issue Ubuntu Xenial Xerus (development branch) \n \l In some cases where you suspect you are on centos or redhat, maybe because you noticed the package versions are old enough to be used by columbus while sailing the open seas, then you can use either cat /etc/centos-release or cat /etc/redhat-release which will give you result such as : CentOS release 6.2 (Final) Kernel Info now as far as finding the kernel info goes you can get all the info you need via uname. $ uname -a […]

Letsencrypt ssl cert for mumble

I needed to set up a mumble server for a friends minecraft community. The Mumble software uses a client–server architecture which allows users to talk to each other via the same server. It has a very simple administrative interface and features high sound quality and low latency where possible. All communication is encrypted to make sure user privacy using either a self signed cert or a cert purchased via a vendor. The great thing about Mumble is that it’s free and open-source software, is cross-platform, and is released under the terms of the new BSD license. Since letsencrypt is awesome and provides completely free certs to the end users, I figured it would be perfect to use in this attempt.  So I started on the road to acquire a letsencrypt ssl cert for mumble. First we need to acquire the letsencrypt client. for this you need git. git clone https://github.com/letsencrypt/letsencrypt cd letsencrypt ./letsencrypt-auto certonly –standalone –standalone-supported-challenges tls-sni-01 A text / curses bases dialogue will start. it will ask you to input your domain(s) you want a cert for. If you want multiple domains or multiple subdomains at the same time just separate them via a space or a comma, follow the prompts and it will install your cert in /etc/letsencrypt/live/<domain>/cert.pem. So far so good! now you need to install murmur/mumble-server on your machine. I would like to tell you how to do it but due to the nature of software it might change, the best way to do it is via checking the official mumble wiki for info […]

Ubuntu-powered tablet coming from Spain to launch soon

We can finally talk about an Ubuntu-powered tablet entering the market. The Canonical software developer has finally started to talk about the device, which will be a modified existing tablet from Spanish manufacturer BQ. The Aquaris M10 tablet will be modified to become the first piece of consumer Ubuntu hardware to become a PC when you connect a mouse, keyboard and display to it.       Under the chassis, things will remain the same, including the 10.1-inch display and the quad-core MediaTek MT8163A chipset. This is not the first attempt at a melange between an Android device and Ubuntu. Canonical released an Ubuntu installer for the Nexus 7 a few years back, and Nexus 10 enjoyed a preview version of Ubuntu Touch.   The Ubuntu interface will transform into a desktop view once the peripherals are connected to the tablet and this shift will make it easier for the user to multitask, or run desktop and mobile apps. Users can add more software via the platform app store, where a lot of work will have to be done to make an Ubuntu mobile device relevant on the market.   Source: Endgadget