Alsa CLI Volume control

I couldn’t find the silly volume control in the system settings one day so i figured there had to be something I could use to control volume settings like mic boost without needing a gui or remembering names and numbers for the CLI. well there is and it’s so easy a caveman could do it (hah remember those ads….)…. so without further ado here’s a fun and great way to control your volume via Alsa CLI Volume control. type the following then use your arrows to move right/left and make the volume higher or lower by using up/down keys: alsamixer -c 0 the 0 at the end is the number of your device. if a system only has one device you will use 0. if you have two devices you can use 0 or 1. it tells you the name of the device currently being edited so you don’t give yourself a heart attack by changing the wrong volume. picture of the control is attached.   [et_pb_section admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”] [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Ubuntu 16.04 release changes & info

Ubuntu 16.04, code-named “Xenial Xerus”, is here and its amazing! many new changes, many new additions and some removals of old outdated software/functionality. Unity has been polished and streamlined along with the much maligned ads have been removed! so lets get into the details. Snap Packages Ubuntu 16.04 LTS introduces a new application format, the ‘snap’, which can be installed alongside traditional deb packages. These two packaging formats live comfortably next to one another and enable Ubuntu to maintain its existing processes for development and updates. In short you can now install third party apps or who desktop environments without having to worry about polluting your OS! Everything stays confined away from the rest of the system in a nice little self contained environment yet still allows access to the rest of the system. So you have Apps can install with their own specific set of libraries and dependencies without issues with other existing apps or ones you may install in the future. Safety & security are bolstered across the board. Packages As with any ubuntu upgrade there are many package upgrades and software changes. Ubuntu now defaults to kernel 4.4+ python2 is out and python 3.5 is now the base. you can still install python 2 but python 3 is the new norm. Vim by default now uses python 3. Golang is now using th 1.6 toolchain. With the recent discoveries in vulnerable crypto settings in openssh, the new base OpenSSH 7.2p2 disables many to bolster security. the GNU toolchain is now updated to […]

Linux distribution info & kernel info

Do you have multiple vms and real machines you use for random testing, and small tasks? need to know what machine you are on? what kernel you are using? what the current Linux distribution info is? what OS version did you last install on here? and more such questions? well! we have some of the answers for you. well maybe not answers, but more like small tools so you can get the answers! Distribution info lsb_release -a on my ubuntu system it gives the following result : $ lsb_release -a No LSB modules are available. Distributor ID: Ubuntu Description: Ubuntu Xenial Xerus (development branch) Release: 16.04 Codename: xenial On a debian system it gives the following result : # lsb_release -a No LSB modules are available. Distributor ID: Debian Description: Debian GNU/Linux 8.4 (jessie) Release: 8.4 Codename: jessie If lsb_release -a doesn’t cut it for you then you can try cat /etc/issue as a result we see the following examples : # cat /etc/issue Debian GNU/Linux 8 \n \l $ cat /etc/issue Ubuntu Xenial Xerus (development branch) \n \l In some cases where you suspect you are on centos or redhat, maybe because you noticed the package versions are old enough to be used by columbus while sailing the open seas, then you can use either cat /etc/centos-release or cat /etc/redhat-release which will give you result such as : CentOS release 6.2 (Final) Kernel Info now as far as finding the kernel info goes you can get all the info you need via uname. $ uname -a […]

Letsencrypt ssl cert for mumble

I needed to set up a mumble server for a friends minecraft community. The Mumble software uses a client–server architecture which allows users to talk to each other via the same server. It has a very simple administrative interface and features high sound quality and low latency where possible. All communication is encrypted to make sure user privacy using either a self signed cert or a cert purchased via a vendor. The great thing about Mumble is that it’s free and open-source software, is cross-platform, and is released under the terms of the new BSD license. Since letsencrypt is awesome and provides completely free certs to the end users, I figured it would be perfect to use in this attempt.  So I started on the road to acquire a letsencrypt ssl cert for mumble. First we need to acquire the letsencrypt client. for this you need git. git clone https://github.com/letsencrypt/letsencrypt cd letsencrypt ./letsencrypt-auto certonly –standalone –standalone-supported-challenges tls-sni-01 A text / curses bases dialogue will start. it will ask you to input your domain(s) you want a cert for. If you want multiple domains or multiple subdomains at the same time just separate them via a space or a comma, follow the prompts and it will install your cert in /etc/letsencrypt/live/<domain>/cert.pem. So far so good! now you need to install murmur/mumble-server on your machine. I would like to tell you how to do it but due to the nature of software it might change, the best way to do it is via checking the official mumble wiki for info […]

Linux HP Smart Array Raid Controller

A client has a machine in a DC that has a raid controller and 4 hdd’s set to raid 10, that’s all I was told. I wanted to keep an eye on the hdds, so I needed to install a utility that can monitor and interact with the raid controller.  In my case I have the hp smart array raid controller as you will see in just a bit, you may have a different controller from this one by a different manufacturer, or it may require a different version of the software tool from HP, please check on the HP site linked below before continuing on. There is a chance of serious data loss if you don’t follow common sense practices and MAKE BACKUPS. I needed to do a few things, find out which controller is it, find latest of control utility for it, install said utility and then check on the drives. that isnt always easy, sadly. First we check who makes this system. dmidecode | grep -A3 ‘^System Information’ Sample result: System Information Manufacturer: HP Product Name: ProLiant DL160 G6 Version: Second we check lspci to see what controller we have installed. lspci -k|grep -i -A2 raid Sample Result : 04:00.0 RAID bus controller: Hewlett-Packard Company Smart Array G6 controllers (rev 01) Subsystem: Hewlett-Packard Company Smart Array P410 Kernel driver in use: hpsa Now we know we have a HP machine, DL160 G6 to be exact in this case, and the exact rev of the card itself. We need to install the HP provided software for it.  The […]

Proxmox IP bridge for single public IP

  I just setup a test copy of proxmox 4.1 and realized I only had one IP attached to the box. So I had to set up a bridge and forward ports to the internal IPs. So the basic idea is, we are going to set up a new virtual interface bridge in your networking file. This requires a working proxmox machine up and running. I am using a standard install, no changes made to the network prior to this. Proxmox Desired Network Layout External IP ————————- proxmox server as NAT ————————— Internal IP 1.2.3.4 ————————- 1.2.3.4 NAT 10.0.0.10 ————————-10.0.0.10   Current network Layout when we check /etc/network/interfaces we see the following : # The loopback network interface auto lo iface lo inet loopback # for Routing auto vmbr1 iface vmbr1 inet manual post-up /etc/pve/kvm-networking.sh bridge_ports dummy0 bridge_stp off bridge_fd 0 # vmbr0: Bridging. Make sure to use only MAC adresses that were assigned to you. auto vmbr0 iface vmbr0 inet static address 1.2.3.4 netmask 255.255.255.0 network 1.2.3.0 broadcast 1.2.3.255 gateway 1.2.3.254 bridge_ports eth0 bridge_stp off bridge_fd 0 iface vmbr0 inet6 static address 1:2:3:4::5 netmask 64 post-up /sbin/ip -f inet6 route add 1:2:3:4:ff:ff:ff:ff dev vmbr0 post-up /sbin/ip -f inet6 route add default via 1:2:3:4:ff:ff:ff:ff pre-down /sbin/ip -f inet6 route del default via 1:2:3:4:ff:ff:ff:ff pre-down /sbin/ip -f inet6 route del 1:2:3:4:ff:ff:ff:ff dev vmbr0 As you can see above we have a working interfaces file just with pseudo IPs instead of real ones. yours will of course have your own IP. Also, you may not have an […]